10 Cheapest Countries To Live In Europe For Expats: A Comprehensive Guide

Cheapest Countries To Live In Europe For Expats
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Photo by Oleksandr Pidvalnyi

Europe is a continent that offers a wide variety of cultures, landscapes, and lifestyles. However, one of the biggest factors that people consider when choosing a place to live is the cost of living. In this blog post, we will explore the 10 cheapest countries to live in Europe for Expats, based on the cost of living index.

10 Reasons Why These Countries are a Budget-Friendly Option for Travelers

1. Lower cost of accommodation:

These countries tend to have lower costs for accommodation, whether for rent or purchase, making it a budget-friendly option for travelers.

2. Cheap transportation:

The cost of transportation in these countries is relatively low, whether by public transport or by car.

3. Affordable food:

These countries have a lower cost of food and groceries, making it a budget-friendly option for travelers.

4. Low cost of entertainment:

The cost of entertainment in these countries is relatively low, whether it be visiting museums, parks, or other tourist attractions.

5. Fewer tourist crowds:

These countries generally have fewer tourists, which can make it a more budget-friendly option as there are fewer crowds and higher availability of accommodations and activities.

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6. More favorable exchange rates:

These countries may have more favorable exchange rates for tourists, making their money go further.

7. Lower prices for souvenirs:

The cost of souvenirs and local crafts in these countries is relatively low, making it a budget-friendly option for travelers.

8. Low cost of healthcare:

These countries have lower costs for healthcare services, which can be beneficial for travelers.

9. Affordable shopping:

These countries have lower costs for clothing, electronics, and other consumer goods, making it a budget-friendly option for travelers.

10. Scenic and beautiful nature:

These countries are often known for their scenic and beautiful nature, which can be enjoyed for free or at a low cost, making it a budget-friendly option for travelers.

10 Cheapest Countries To Live In Europe For Expats

1. Bulgaria

With a cost of living index of 44.97, Bulgaria is the cheapest country to live in Europe. The cost of housing is very low, with the average rent for a one-bedroom apartment in the city center being around $250 per month.

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Food is also relatively cheap, with a grocery basket of basic items costing around $50. Public transportation is also affordable, with a monthly pass costing around $20.

The cost of housing, food, and transportation is very low, making it an attractive option for budget-conscious travelers and Expats. Tourist attraction includes the Rila Monastery, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, and the ancient city of Nessebar.

2. Romania

With a cost of living index of 48.52, Romania is the second cheapest country in Europe. The cost of housing is relatively low, with the average rent for a one-bedroom apartment in the city center being around $300 per month.

Food is also relatively cheap, with a grocery basket of basic items costing around $55. Public transportation is also affordable, with a monthly pass costing around $20.

The country has a rich culture, beautiful landscapes, and a low cost of living. Tourist attractions include the medieval fortified citadel of Sighisoara and the famous Bran Castle, also known as Dracula’s Castle.

3. Hungary

With a cost of living index of 52.34, Hungary is the third cheapest country in Europe. The cost of housing is relatively low, with the average rent for a one-bedroom apartment in the city center being around $350 per month.

Food is also relatively cheap, with a grocery basket of basic items costing around $60. Public transportation is also affordable, with a monthly pass costing around $25.

The country is known for its thermal baths and delicious food, as well as its low cost of living. Tourist attractions include the Széchenyi thermal baths in Budapest and the historic Hungarian Parliament Building.

4. Poland

With a cost of living index of 55.61, Poland is the fourth cheapest country in Europe. The cost of housing is relatively low, with the average rent for a one-bedroom apartment in the city center being around $400 per month.

Food is also relatively cheap, with a grocery basket of basic items costing around $65. Public transportation is also affordable, with a monthly pass costing around $30.

The country has a rich history and culture, and the cost of living is relatively low. Tourist attractions include the Wawel Castle in Krakow and the historic Old Town of Gdansk.

5. Czech Republic

With a cost of living index of 56.51, the Czech Republic is the fifth cheapest country in Europe. The cost of housing is relatively low, with the average rent for a one-bedroom apartment in the city center being around $450 per month.

Food is also relatively cheap, with a grocery basket of basic items costing around $70. Public transportation is also affordable, with a monthly pass costing around $35.

The country is known for its beautiful cities, particularly Prague, which is known for its stunning architecture and historic sites. The cost of living is relatively low, making it a great option for budget-conscious travelers. Tourist attractions include the Charles Bridge and Prague Castle.

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6. Serbia

With a cost of living index of 57.74, Serbia is the sixth cheapest country in Europe. The cost of housing is relatively low, with the average rent for a one-bedroom apartment in the city center being around $500 per month.

Food is also relatively cheap, with a grocery basket of basic items costing around $75. Public transportation is also affordable, with a monthly pass costing around $40.

The country is known for its rich culture and history, as well as its beautiful nature. The cost of living is relatively low, making it a great option for budget-conscious travelers. Tourist attractions include the Kalemegdan Fortress and the Nikola Tesla Museum in Belgrade.

7. Croatia

With a cost of living index of 59.26, Croatia is the seventh cheapest country in Europe. The cost of housing is relatively low, with the average rent for a one-bedroom apartment in the city center being around $550 per month.

Food is also relatively cheap, with a grocery basket of basic items costing around $80. Public transportation is also affordable, with a monthly pass costing around $45.

The country is known for its beautiful beaches and islands, particularly those in the Dalmatian coast, and its historic cities like Dubrovnik. The cost of living is relatively low, making it a great option for budget-conscious travelers. Tourist attractions include the Old City of Dubrovnik and the Plitvice Lakes National Park.

8. Lithuania

With a cost of living index of 59.51, Lithuania is the eighth cheapest country in Europe. The cost of housing is relatively low, with the average rent for a one-bedroom apartment in the city center being around $600 per month.

Food is also relatively cheap, with a grocery basket of basic items costing around $85. Public transportation is also affordable, with a monthly pass costing around $50.

The country is known for its rich history and beautiful cities like Vilnius and Kaunas. The cost of living is relatively low, making it a great option for budget-conscious travelers. Tourist attractions include the Vilnius Old Town, which is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, and the Kaunas Castle.

9. Latvia

With a cost of living index of 60.48, Latvia is the ninth cheapest country in Europe. The cost of housing is relatively low, with the average rent for a one-bedroom apartment in the city center being around $650 per month.

Food is also relatively cheap, with a grocery basket of basic items costing around $90. Public transportation is also affordable, with a monthly pass costing around $55.

The country is known for its beautiful nature, particularly in Riga, and its rich culture and history. The cost of living is relatively low, making it a great option for budget-conscious travelers. Tourist attractions include the Riga Old Town, which is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, and the Riga Central Market.

10. Bosnia and Herzegovina

With a cost of living index of 60.70, Bosnia and Herzegovina is the tenth cheapest country in Europe. The cost of housing is relatively low, with the average rent for a one-bedroom apartment in the city center being around $700 per month.

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Food is also relatively cheap, with a grocery basket of basic items costing around $95. Public transportation is also affordable, with a monthly pass costing around $60.

The country is known for its rich culture and history, particularly in the cities of Sarajevo and Mostar, and its beautiful nature, such as the mountains and rivers. The cost of living is relatively low, making it a great option for budget-conscious travelers. Tourist attractions include the Old Bridge of Mostar and the Sarajevo Tunnel Museum.

Unveiling The Reasons Behind The Affordability Of Eastern European Countries

It’s worth noting that these are just approximate costs and can vary depending on the city or region within the country. Additionally, the cost of living will also depend on an individual’s lifestyle and expenses.

However, these countries offer a relatively low cost of living compared to other European countries, making them a great option for budget-conscious travelers and Expats.

There are a few reasons why these countries are considered to be some of the cheapest in Europe to live in.

First, the cost of living in these countries is generally low due to their lower GDP per capita compared to other European countries. This means that the average income and standard of living are lower, and therefore the cost of goods and services is also lower.

Second, the cost of housing is relatively low in these countries. The cost of the property, whether for rent or purchase, is generally lower than in other European countries. This is due to a combination of factors, such as lower demand, lower salaries, and a less developed property market.

Third, the cost of food and groceries is relatively low in these countries. This is due to the lower cost of production, distribution, and marketing of these goods. The cost of food and groceries is also lower due to the lower salaries of the farmers and food producers.

Fourth, the cost of transportation is relatively low in these countries. This is due to the lower cost of fuel and the lower cost of maintaining and operating public transportation systems.

Lastly, the cost of living in these countries is relatively low due to the lower cost of living for services like healthcare and education. These countries have lower costs for these services, which are often heavily subsidized by the government.

It’s worth noting that these are general reasons, and the cost of living in each country can vary greatly depending on the city or region within the country, as well as depending on an individual’s lifestyle and expenses.

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